What You Can Do Instead Of Filing For Bankruptcy

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It’s hard to make the decision of filing for personal bankruptcy; however, sometimes there’s no choice. Going into this situation is best served when you are armed with some good ideas and insights about what is going to be involved. Continue to read this article to learn what has helped others who have filed for bankruptcy.

Bankruptcy is a very complicated, and scary process. Usually anyone who applies for it, is at the end of ones rope. To help you feel more in control of things, be sure to educate yourself about the entire process before making your decision. Learn the requirements you have to meet before applying.Learn about what the process will be when you do apply.Finally, learn how your future will be affected by it after you file.

When you file for bankruptcy you limit your options for many future loan options. Many banks do not forgive bankruptcy and it shows on your credit report for 10 years. Think twice before making the decision to file for bankruptcy. You might want to defer your bills for a couple of months, instead of hurting your credit for 10 years.

Instead of relying on random selections from the phone book or Internet, ask around and get personal recommendations. There are a number of companies who may take advantage of your situation, so always work with someone that is trustworthy.

See what you can find out. Each state does have varying laws on the subject of bankruptcy. Because of this, it is important that you meet with a specialized lawyer to discuss whether bankruptcy is right for you. Generally, initial consultations are free to you so you are able to determine which path you should head down at no cost.

After your bankruptcy has been discharged, or finalized, a good way to begin re-building your credit is to obtain a pre-paid credit card. This type of card is usually available at your local bank. The card is secured by the amount of money you load onto it. You can not charge more than what you have loaded onto the card, so over-spending shouldn’t be a problem. It works like a regular credit card, with monthly statements and payments. After you have kept this card in good standing for a period of time, you may be able to have it switched into a regular, revolving credit card.

Know the difference between Chapters 7 and 13 bankruptcies. Chapter 7 will wipe your debts clean, meaning you will not owe what you file against. Chapter 13 requires you to agree to repay your debts. These debts need to be repaid within three to five years of the filing date.

Before you consider filing for bankruptcy, you should make a pre-determination if bankruptcy may be the right choice. First, make a list of all income, including, salary, child support, alimony, rent and any other sources you may have. Then, make a list of your bills. These would include mortgage, rent, car payments, monthly credit card payments, groceries and gas. If your monthly bill total is more than the income you bring in, it may be time to seek the advice of a bankruptcy attorney, who can help you make the final decision.

Sometimes declaring personal bankruptcy is simply unavoidable. Having read the preceding piece, you now possess critical insight and knowledge offered by those with actual prior bankruptcy experience. Learning from others who have filed for bankruptcy is the best way to ensure that you make intelligent decisions and avoid making any mistakes.