Bankruptcy: What To Consider When Filing

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For most people, the concept of filing personal bankruptcy is something that evokes worry, uncertainty and even fear. The best way to combat those emotions and make a wise financial decision is to gain an understanding of precisely what the bankruptcy process entails for consumers. By using the tips and guidance in the article that follows, it is possible to approach bankruptcy with a fresh, well-informed perspective.

Trying to exclude family members you owe money to before filing for personal bankruptcy can get you into serious hot water. The court will look into who you pay-off as far as a year back, and if they find you showing favor to family over other creditors, they could invalidate your filing completely.

A huge mistake people make before filing for bankruptcy is maxing out their credit cards. This can lead to disaster when you file and the credit card companies might not discharge the debt. If you can, you need to stop using your credit cards at least six months before you file, and ideally for a year prior. Also, do your best to pay the minimum payments on these cards for at least six months before you file.

It is essential that you are honest and forthright in the documentation you provide for your bankruptcy filings. Do not hide any income or assets or go on a spending spree before filing for bankruptcy: the court will find out and will not have a positive opinion of you.

Take some time each day to stop thinking about your bankruptcy. It can seem like a thought you cannot get out of your head, but it is important to step away from the situation before you become too upset. Not only that, but removing it from your thoughts allows you to bring a fresher, more optimistic perspective to the table when you take up the subject again.

A great personal bankruptcy tip is to consider what kind of bankruptcy you’d like to go for. In general, chapter 13 is much better because it doesn’t taint your credit report. It allows you to hold on to most of your belongings. Chapter 7 is much more extreme to file for.

If you are planning to file for bankruptcy, be certain not to transfer any of your belongings or valuables to another person. This includes taking your name off of joint bank accounts or other financial assets. The court will be looking for anything of value in order to repay creditors, and you will be asked under oath whether you have left anything out. If you do not tell the truth, you may be charged with perjury and could possibly spend time in jail. Remember, honesty is the best policy.

It is possible that filing personal bankruptcy is something which you have been curious, but have not yet had the courage to seriously explore. The most beneficial way to investigate your options, when it comes to personal bankruptcy, is to take the time necessary to study the fundamental of the process. Use the ideas in this piece, and you can acquire a thorough appreciation of the way bankruptcy may be of significant benefit to you and your family.