Navigating The World After Declaring Personal Bankruptcy

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Many debtors have the common misconception that filing for personal bankruptcy is the worst thing that they can do to their credit score. This is not the case. Your score will be substantially lower, if you continue to juggle payments that you cannot afford. The late payments on multiple accounts will cause more damage than bankruptcy. Read on for more tips concerning bankruptcy.

If you have late payments on credit accounts or accounts that have been sent to collections, you are probably already aware of how insistent creditors can be. After you have filed for bankruptcy, you no longer need to endure the threatening and continuous phone calls from creditors and collection agencies. All you must do is refer them to your attorney who will confirm the bankruptcy for them. After this, it is illegal for creditors to harass you in any way.

If you’ve considered the pros and cons involved with choosing bankruptcy, and you feel that this is the only option you have left, be sure to consider all the personal bankruptcy laws. Don’t just sit back for the ride; be sure to work together with your lawyer so that you can get the best outcome possible.

No good will come of trying to conceal your assets or your liabilities in the bankruptcy process; you want to be scrupulously honest when you declare bankruptcy. Regardless of the agency you file with, ensure that you tell them all they should know about your current financial situation, regardless of how good or bad it is. Never hide anything, and make sure you come up with a well devised plan for dealing with bankruptcy.

A useful tip for those thinking about using personal bankruptcy as a way out of their financial difficulties is to exercise great care when choosing an attorney. By selecting a practitioner who specializes in bankruptcy and who has handled a large number of such cases, it is possible to ensure the very best outcome and the greatest likelihood of forging a positive financial future.

If you have filed for Chapter 13 bankruptcy, but realize that you are unable to meet your payment obligations, you may be able to convert to a Chapter 7 bankruptcy instead. To qualify for the conversion, you must never have converted your bankruptcy before and also undergo a financial evaluation. The laws surrounding this process are always changing, so be sure to talk with an attorney who can help you navigate this process.

Consider filing Chapter 13 rather than Chapter 7, if you are facing foreclosure. A Chapter 13 bankruptcy allows you to create a restructured payment plan which includes your mortgage arrears. This will allow you to get your mortgage payments current, so that you won’t lose your home. Chapter 13 doesn’t require you to turn over property, so you don’t have to worry about the homestead exemption, either.

Now that you know some of the facts regarding personal bankruptcy, you should have a better idea if it is the best financial move to make. Carefully consider the amount of debt-to-income that you have. Use the calculation, as well as, how many late payments you face each month, as a guide to decide.